Category Archives: Bumbling Bea

Student Survival: The Importance of Pleasure Reading for a Kid

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Student Survival:  The Importance of Pleasure Reading for a Kid

Recently, I was looking for a  pleasure reading book to purchase for my upcoming trip over seas. I was having a difficult time finding one.

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Some people are selective about the genres they read.  I usually gravitate toward books with quirky characters in ordinary appearing plots. I say “ordinary appearing” because it is always intriguing to find the characters going somewhere else than you expected.

However, I am known to cheat and read the last chapter of a book if a. the story is moving too slowly for me or b. I’m dying to know what happens. When I was a child, my mother would scold me for doing so–still haven’t kicked the habit.  Sorry, Mom.

I worry about kids’ reading preferences. It seems many writers write for whatever trend is popular the time. A few years ago, it was zombies and time travelers. Not every child wants to read fantasy or graphic novels.  That’s why I penned Bumbling Bea.  If you haven’t picked up my book, you might want to try it.  I promise you, it isn’t your run of the mill plot! Check it out here: http://tinyurl.com/n5at3oh

I ran on to an article concerning this concern and I thought you’d be interested, too.

Indie Book

Promoting the Pleasures of Reading: Why It Matters to Kids and to Country

June 10, 2017Advocacy, Inquiry, Literacy, Reading, Teachingpleasure readingLu Ann McNabb

This post is written by member Jeffrey Wilhelm.

Reading Unbound: Why Kids Need to Read What They Want and Why We Should Let Them was this past year’s winner of the NCTE David H. Russell Award for Distinguished Research in English Education.

The research findings that we report in Reading Unbound have profound implications for us as teachers, for our students, and for democracy.

In our book, we argue that pleasure reading is a civil rights issue. Why? Because fine-grained longitudinal studies (e.g., the British Cohort study: Sullivan & Brown, 2013; and John Guthrie’s analysis of PISA data, 2004, among many others) demonstrate that pleasure reading in youth is the most explanatory factor in both cognitive progress and social mobility over time.

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Pleasure reading is more powerful than parents’ educational attainment or socioeconomic status. This means that pleasure reading is THE way to address social inequalities in terms of actualizing our students’ full potential and overcoming barriers to satisfying and successful lives.

We think that our data explain why pleasure reading leads to cognitive growth and social mobility.

The major takeaway for teachers is to focus on pleasure in our teaching. Pleasure has many forms: play pleasure/immersive pleasure, when you get lost in a book—this is a prerequisite pleasure and we can foster it in various ways, such as teaching with an inquiry approach, using drama and visualization strategies, etc.; work pleasure, where you get a functional and immediately applicable tool for doing something in your life; inner work pleasure, where you imaginatively rehearse for your life and consider what kind of person you want to be; intellectual pleasure, where you figure out what things mean and how texts were constructed to convey meanings and effects; and social pleasure, in which you relate to authors, characters, other readers, and yourself by staking your own identity.

Kids (like all other human beings!) do what they find pleasurable. You get good at what you do and then outgrow yourself by developing new related interests and capacities.

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Play pleasure develops the capacity to engage and immerse oneself, to visualize meanings and relate to characters. It is the desire to love and be loved. Work pleasure is the love of getting something functional done. Work pleasure is about the love of application and visible signs of accomplishment. Readers engaging in this pleasure cultivate transfer of strategies and insights to life.

Inner work pleasure involves imaginatively rehearsing what kind of person one wants to be. As our informant Helen asserted: “It’s not really learning about yourself, it’s learning about what you could be . . . .” and “Characters are ways of thinking really . . . They are ways of being you can try on.”

Inner work is the love of transformation—of connecting to something greater, of striving to become something more. When our informants engaged in this pleasure, they expressed and developed a growth mindset and a sense of personal and social possibility.

Intellectual pleasure is pursued for the joy of figuring things out; it develops the capacity to see connections and solve problems. Our informants developed resilience, grit, and proactivity through the exercise of this pleasure. Erik Erikson argued that staking one’s identity is the primary task of early to late adolescence and that this is achieved through evolving interests and competence.

Social pleasure involves this human developmental project because it involves relating to authors, characters, other readers, and the self in ways that stake identity. Social pleasure is the love of connection—to the self, others, community, and to doing significant work together. This pleasure develops social imagination: the capacity to experience the world from other perspectives; to learn from and appreciate others distant from us in time, space, and experience; and the willingness to relate, reciprocate, attend to, and help others different from ourselves.

In other words, it promotes cognitive progress, wisdom, wholeness, and the democratic project. In fact, all of the pleasures were found to do this.

Our data clearly establish that students gravitate to the kinds of books they need to navigate their current life challenges, and that many ancillary benefits accrue in the realms of cognition, psychology, emotional development, and socialness. So much so that we developed the mantra: Kids read what they need!

This finding led us to be more trusting of kids’ choices and to ask them about why they chose to read what they did, and eventually to championing these choices. We likewise found that each of the marginalized genres we studied (romance, horror, vampire, fantasy, and dystopia) provided specific benefits and helped students navigate different individual developmental challenges.

Our data also establish that young people are doing sophisticated intellectual work in their pleasure reading, much of it just the kind of work that the Common Core and other next generation standards call for. So making pleasure more central to our practice is not in conflict with working to achieve standards.

Standards and all the other significant goals described here can be achieved if teachers value interpretive complexity as much as they do textual complexity, if they create inquiry contexts that reward entering a story world and doing psychological and social work in addition to more traditional academic goals, and if they provide opportunities for choice and meaningful conversation.

Given the benefits of each pleasure, we are convinced that pleasure reading is not only a civil right, it is a social necessity of democracy.

That is why we urge you to promote pleasure reading in your classroom and school, and it is why our book is filled with practical ideas for how to do so while promoting each of the five pleasures. It is monumental work—and it is work we must undertake with the greatest urgency—particularly at this moment in history.

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What are some of your favorite genres to read?  I’d love to hear from you.

Contact me at dhcbaldwin@gmail.com or DeborahBaldwin.net

National Haiku Day Bumbling Bea Style

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National Haiku Day Bumbling Bea Style

Today, April 15 is National Haiku Day.

You gotta wonder who thinks up these national days….

CHERRY BLOSSOMS

When I think of Haiku, I think of gorgeous flowering trees in Japan.

I’m sure there are poets who write them without thinking like I do.

I did a little researching and found Creative.Writing.Now. com.  It’s a website founded by writing teachers about writing.  One of their pages is about haiku poetry.  

The following are typical of haiku:

  • A focus on nature.

  • A “season word” such as “snow” which tells the reader what time of year it is.

  • A division somewhere in the poem, which focuses first on one thing, than on another. The relationship between these two parts is sometimes surprising.

  • Instead of saying how a scene makes him or her feel, the poet shows the details that caused that emotion. If the sight of an empty winter sky made the poet feel lonely, describing that sky can give the same feeling to the reader.

In honor of National Haiku Day, April 15 I created a few haiku about the characters of my award winning book, Bumbling Bea. There are several acknowledgements to the Japanese culture in the story so it only seemed fitting.

 My haiku aren’t about trees, flowers and clouds, but they are about the nature of human beings.  (Get it, get it?)

Bumbling Bea

Beatrice about Michiko:

Laughing and bowing

Her voice strong and dramatic

I wish I was her.

Bumbling Bea

Michiko thoughts about her mother:

You loudly scold me

Stretching, growing up I cry

This life’s mine not yours.

Bumbling Bea

Peter’s reflection about the  Michiko sabotage:

Devil leaves of three

Softly touch innocent skin

Oozing mounds erupt.

Bumbling Bea

Bumbling Bea would say:

I take over you

blurting outrageous things

Always regretting them.

Mr. Brace quips:

As father I’m bound

To family duties

Begrudging all.

Mrs. Brace to Mr. Brace:

Can’t you see I’m sad?

It’s hard to forget

Happy days, sweet nights.

BB chapter 16

The Cast’s thoughts:

Performance is super

Michiko adds spice and flare

But what’s with the freeze?

Lost?  You won’t be once you read my book.  Check it out here:

http://tinyurl.cpm/n5at3o

Contact me at dhcbaldwin@gmail.com or check out my website at DeborahBaldwin.net

 

Get to Know Indie Author Deborah Baldwin

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Get to Know Indie Author Deborah Baldwin

Find my award winning book at: hthttp://tinyurl.com/lk5db54

Hello!
Who is this Dramamomma?

I live in Kansas in the vibrant university town of Lawrence. I am a happily married wife of thirty-four years and a mother to our two grown daughters and wonderful step son.
We moved to Kansas last summer to be near our family and our new grandchild. I was born and raised in Kansas, although I have never lived in the state as an adult until now. In some respects, I feel very at home here but that’s the midwest for you. 😊

I’m an award winning veteran drama teacher and very experienced and successful youth theatre and community theatre director doing both for over thirty-five years.
Dramamommaspeaks is about teaching drama at all levels, directing, the arts and drawing wisdom from my experiences. Every so often I will blog about other subjects such as parenting, my life, etc.

I am an indie author of Bumbling Bea, an award winning middle grade book concerning an unusual friendship between two girls. Lastly, I am a featured writer for Litpick.com an international award winning website for student book reviewers, parents and librarians. Check out my articles here the Facebook page for Litpick.com.

One of my firsts– a “fan” of Bumbling Bea–she made TWO book reports on it,

Please take your time and peruse the blog and follow me!  It would mean a great deal to me to know  you read my posts.
This blog, like teaching, performing and directing, makes me feel connected to the world. In these times, don’t we all need that?

Talk with you soon.

Having fun in Colorado, one of my favorite places!

One of my better outfits, I must say…

 

Our first grandchild loves books, too!

Contact me at Dhcbaldwin@gmail.com or check out my website at DeborahBaldwin.net. You can follow me on Facebook at BumblingBea. Or follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DeborahHBaldwin
Information on this website may be copied for personal use only. No part of this website may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the author. Requests to the author and publisher for permission should be addressed to the following email: dhcbaldwin@gmail.com

Bumbling Bea is in a Holding Pattern

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Bumbling Bea is in a Holding Pattern

Folks, if you are checking here to see if she is republished yet, the answer is no. I’m waiting on the proof which should be here by Friday or the weekend. After that, we’ll get the presses running and announce her publishing. 

BUT, if you want to make this easy on yourself, how about following the blog? 

Or joining my email list?  Join here at: http://dramamommaspeaks.us14.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=0ca48ac000f6f155527c9e1eb&id=2e92e66408

Giveaway Contest for Bumbling Bea 2.0! 

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Giveaway Contest for Bumbling Bea 2.0! 

Enter my giveaway for a chance to win a copy of the NEW Bumbling Bea book, second edition! Click the link below to get started!

This contest will be running starting TODAY at 3:00 CST – next Tuesday February 21st at 12:00 PM CST.  

Entering is quick and easy! Three lucky winners will receive a paperback copy of the new Bumbling Bea 2.0!

#bumblingbea2giveaway

Copy and paste: https://gleam.io/campaigns/4p9Oq/facebook-install/DoNa2N

Our new cover! 

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We’re unveiling a new cover for Bumbling Bea over the next few days. Check back to see it. 

Big News Tuesday–Check back often

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Author Interview and Free Books on Facebook

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Come see ME on Facebook this afternoon at 4:00 CST at:https://www.facebook.com/events/1650685205224159/